Telling Spatial Stories in the Library

Telling Spatial Stories in the Library

What is your story… This is a question Emma Slayton and Jessica Benner have been asking through our work with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) at Carnegie Mellon University Libraries. Both of us are excited to develop new services, learning opportunities, and spaces for discussion centered around spatial research. For example, earlier this year, we began offering open
office hours for those with questions concerning mapping or spatial datasets (Wednesdays between 12 and 3pm in the Sorrels library, Wean Hall floor 4).

All Ghouls Day Screening: Carnival of Souls & Night of the Living Dead

Carnegie Mellon University Libraries celebrates true independence in horror cinema this All Hallow’s Eve with all-day screenings of Herk Harvey’s "Carnival of Souls" and CMU alumnus George A. Romero’s "Night of the Living Dead," on view in the 1st floor seating area across from the circulation desk in Hunt Library. 

It's Time to Celebrate: A History of Past CMU Inaugurations

Past CMU Inaugurations

This Friday Carnegie Mellon will inaugurate it’s 10th president, though we don’t actually have much experience with inauguration ceremonies.  Not only are we a relatively young institution, but most of our presidents served relatively long terms.  Hamerschlag stayed for 19 years, Doherty for 14, Warner for 15, and Cyert almost broke Hamerschlag’s record with 18 years.

What I Didn't Know About World War I

Daily Life During World War I

When I was small, my grandparents had a console TV with a framed photo sitting on top – right about eye level to a child. In the photo my grandfather, in uniform, sat astride a huge black horse. I was told he was in the Cavalry in World War I, but I had no idea what that meant.

Carnegie Mellon's Inaugural Open Science Symposium

Science research output has historically been difficult to access and reuse. It is often published in journals with very expensive subscription costs, typically paid for by university libraries. The data and code used to generate figures in publications are commonly not shared or are only shared by request.  These practices have made it difficult for scientists to access, reuse, and reproduce the work of others, and have in part led to a widely reported "reproducibility crisis" in science.  A related concern is that the public, which pays for a lot of science research with tax dollars, cannot access much of it.

How I Explain Metadata to the Non-Metadata World

For the few years that I’ve been working with metadata, I’ve had to answer that question that most librarians who don’t work with reference and books dread, “What do you do?” I do admit that at times, I’ve used the trite phrase, “data about data” knowing full well it went a bit deeper than just that.  In recent times, I have begun to improve my explanation to them by being more whimsical in my answer thereby avoiding that stress or frustration that comes with explaining this work to people who probably would
not understand no matter how much explaining you did in technical terms. 

What Truth Sounds Like

What Truth Sounds Like

What Truth Sounds Like: Robert F. Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our Unfinished Conversation About Race In America by Michael Eric Dyson (St. Martin's Press, 2018)

In May 1963, Robert F. Kennedy called for a meeting with James Baldwin, one of the most powerful voices of the civil rights movement. Baldwin brought the singers Lena Horne and Harry Belafonte, playwright Lorraine Hansberry, scholar Kenneth Clark, and freedom rider Jerome Smith. Kennedy expected a polite, deferential meeting, but his guests weren’t willing to be patient
and work on policies. Smith was recovering from a savage beating by white supremacists; Baldwin and his friends angrily gave witness to “blackness seen through the prism of pain and trauma.”

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